Want to Increase Your Tax Return? Reduce Your Tax Bill? Open an RRSP!

People. Let me get real with you for a second. Tax season is upon us, and there is this magical unicorn of an account in Canada called an RRSP (Registered Retirement Savings Plan). It will help you reduce the amount of tax that you owe the government, and/or increase your tax return. Interested? I thought you’d be! I just maxed out my RRSP before the March 1, 2018, deadline. So get on it, open your account, and start contributing!

“BUT ALANNA, I DON’T KNOW WHAT AN RRSP IS?”

Funny you should say that out loud! I had an infographic created last year about the RRSPNote that the date on the infographic is for 2017 and this years’ deadline is March 1, 2018!) And if you’re like, “Alanna, I don’t want to look at this cool and helpful infographic you had made for your readers”, then read on Donkey Kong.

What is aN RRSP and why should I have one?

A registered retirement savings plan is an account that will help you save for a happy and financially stress-free retirement. Want to live on a boat in the middle of the ocean, scuba diving all day, surrounded by Great White Sharks? Yes. Please. Mountain climb in the middle of Vancouver Island feeding freshly caught salmon to Grizzly bears every day? Fuck, yes – who wouldn’t? The RRSP will help you achieve your dream retirement, but you need to start right NOW. There are two main reasons why:

1. The money that you contribute to your RRSP is deductible from your taxable income.

Um…. what?

Example time! Say you made $40,000 in 2017, and contribute $3000 to your RRSP. When it comes time to file your taxes, you can claim that $3,000 contribution as a deduction and can calculate your income as if you’ve made $37,000. This will likely put you in a lower tax bracket, saving you money and/or increasing your tax return. Cool, huh?

Yes. Yes, it is cool.

2. The savings in your RRSP are able to grow tax-free. Within your RRSP you can invest in stocks, mutual funds, ETF’s, bonds, and other investments. If you make profits from these investments, they are not taxable until you withdraw the funds, which ideally occurs when you retire. And when you retire and have very little income, you will be in a lower tax bracket than you are now (hopefully), and will have to pay less tax on your withdrawals. Kapeesh?

YAS QUEEN.

sweet BOULDER HOLDERS. how do I start?

You can set up a managed RRSP through a Robo-Advisor like Wealthsimple (which helps to reduce your MER fees, rebalance your portfolio, and is just all around awesome), or you can open one up through your bank, credit union, trust, or insurance company. You can also have your RRSP self-directed, and manage it all on your own (that’s what I do!) However, if you’d like to go that route, I’d suggest contacting me for more information on how to do this.

I’m sold! But I need some more facts.

  • If you work and file an income tax return, are under 71 years old, and have a social insurance number, you should definitely consider opening up an RRSP.
  • Your RRSP contribution room changes every year, and is calculated based on the following:
    • 18% of your earned income from the previous year, with a maximum of $26,230 for the 2017 tax year;
    • Whatever remaining amount is available after any company contributes to your RRSP. If your company contributes 10% of your earned income from the previous year, you can only contribute the remaining 8%.
  • You can withdraw up to $25,000 for a down payment on your first home, and not pay any tax under the Home Buyer’s Plan. However, you have up to 15 years to repay the full amount back into your RRSP.
  • Wanna go back and hit the books? You can withdraw up to $10,000/year, or up to $20,000 in total to help pay for your education using the Lifelong Learning Plan. All you have to do is repay at least 10%/year for up to ten years.
  • It isn’t mandatory that you deduct your RRSP contribution on your tax return in the same year that you made the contribution. You can hold off and deduct it in a future year if you think you will be making more money down the road. So, if you have room in your RRSP and just want it generating some kind of income through an investment, you can just leave it in your RRSP and let that shit grow. Yay compound interest!
  • You can set up a spousal/common-law RRSP, which you can contribute to, but your common-law partner/spouse owns. This reduces their taxable income with your help.

RRSP vs TFSA – CONCLUSION

The RRSP and TFSA are great accounts for all Canadians and you should definitely consider opening up one or both of them, and start contributing ASAP. Depending on your financial situation and short/long-term goals, one account may be more beneficial than the other. If you are only making $25,000/year and are in a low tax bracket, you’d probably be better off with a TFSA. But let’s say you get a raise and go from making $25,000/year to $60,000/year, it would probably be worth contributing to your RRSP to put yourself into a lower tax bracket, saving you some money at the end of the year.

So there you have it! Everything you needed to know about the RRSP. If you’re still hella confused and need some more guidance, please contact me! I’ve helped over 100 millennials and Gen-Y’ers figure out what’s best for them and how to get started – and I can help you too!

 

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